Developers are now expected to do everything by themselves

For the February edition of Leaders in Tech | Berlin, Austin Fraser invited Andrew Holway, founder of Otter Networks, to speak about the current state of DevOps, the impact of new platforms like Kubernetes, and how technology leaders should think about both infrastructure and knowledge management in their organizations.
 
Andrew’s presentation (which was recorded and will be available subsequently) started with a review of the “old world” and the “new world” of software engineering, from when engineers needed to take care of hardware, networking, and all sorts of complicated operational issues in order to run software online. In an in-between phase, Amazon Web Services has abstracted away many of the annoying and frustrating parts. However, Holway posits that the main user that Amazon creates its tools and services for is a DevOps engineer, and that it’s not reasonable to expect developers to directly consume AWS’ APIs. In the new world, Kubernetes and other automated platforms like it have dramatically reduced the complexity of operational work that DevOps engineers used to handle, virtually eliminating the need for DevOps as a discipline.
 
DevOps is FSCKed by Andrew Holway slides:
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/e/2PACX-1vRV4B7JSfyukZRFosukMNwQu7rt8KH1nor44CswGF6zBrdkuwueBJvDg6ZPGoqXHH8AbeA7kYx5AD2v/pub
 
The talk sparked many questions and discussions among the 50+ attendees, who ranged from CTOs to team leads to startup founders. For example, one question from the audience concerned how databases are handled. Andrew’s response revealed the larger trends within software engineering: “Even if you’re consuming your database from the cloud provider, you still have to have some knowledge of databases as a developer – most full stack developers have a good understanding of the databases. The role of DBA disappeared some years ago, I haven’t seen one in ages. The role of DevOps engineer is going the same direction as DBA, and these roles are just being pushed into the development team. Developers are expected to do literally everything by themselves.”
 
Dmitry Galkin, a cloud solutions architect at Cloudification.io attended the Leaders in Tech event because he had checked Otter Networks website in advance and was curious to see what the talk would be about. In the end, he had a different perspective than the speaker. Even though he thought it might work for smaller teams, for bigger and more complex organizations, Dimitry said, “I wouldn’t be so sure that DevOps will disappear in the next five years.”
 
Nicholas Wittstruck was also in the audience at the Leaders in Tech event in Berlin, he has been at several Leaders in Tech meetups. Nicholas is the Head of Shop and IT at Bringmeister.de, and his take on Holway’s presentation was that, “It’s important on a strategic level – when it comes to the next project that you work on, you have these things in mind. In this specific case, when it comes to deploying your  infrastructure next, maybe it makes sense to have a look at Kubernetes and do it on GCP [Google Cloud Platform], even though you’re using AWS right now.”
 
As a returning participant to Austin Fraser’s Leaders in Tech event series, Nicholas Wittstruck has some advice for people who are on the fence: “There are two things that I really like about these meetups. The first one is that there are really interesting talks. It’s also about meeting people that are in the tech scene in Berlin. I’m meeting some people again at each meetup, which is nice for networking. You get to know people who have similar problems.”
 
Many thanks to Secret Escapes for hosting this edition of Leaders in Tech | Berlin in their office in Mitte. Don’t miss the next Leaders in Tech event, become a member of our Meetup group. Leaders in Tech brings together CTOs, CIOs, VPs, Heads of IT, and other senior technology leaders to discuss current tech trends and build lasting relationships.